Email: pcarstens@lifelinetoafrica.org
LIFE LINE TO AFRICA
Copyright © 2007. All Rights Reserved.
Mozambique, Africa
Learn about Mozambique
Source of information: WWW Official Government Page
Located along the Indian Ocean of southern Africa, Mozambique is slightly less than twice the size of California with a population of 17.5 million (’2003 Estimate). In 1975, after centuries of colonial exploitation, Mozambique gained its independence from Portugal. The indigenes population had no access to education during the Colonial Era. An uneducated population combined with a large-scale exodus of whites, mad the country vulnerable to violence. Shortly after independence, the country was plunged into a brutal civil war between the (then) Marxist-Leninist Frelimo government and a rebel movement, Renamo, with principal backing from South Africa. During this 18-year civil war, more than one million people died, two million refugees fled across the borders, and close to three million rural families were internally displaced. Coupled with a severe drought and socialist mismanagement, by the time a peace accord was signed in 1994, much of the country’s economic infrastructure had been destroyed, approximately two million land mines were buried in Mozambique’s arable land, and with a US$80 per capita GNP, Mozambique was classified by the World Bank as the world’s poorest country. Since then Mozambique has made significant progress. The government has undertaken a series of market reforms and liberalization measures. During the late ‘90s, Mozambique boasted one of the fastest growing economies in the world. This momentum was halted by the severe flooding that devastated the southern region of the country in the early part of 2000 and to a lesser extent in the North during 2001.During the years of 2002 and 2003 the country experienced a sever drought.  Not withstanding these setbacks, economic growth rates have rebounded to pre-flood levels. While significant gains have in fact been made, Mozambique still remains one of the world’s poorest counties. Sixty-nine percent of the population still live in abject poverty, and more than one in five children die before the age of five (DHS-’97). Similarly, much of the gains from the economic growth have been limited to the more industrialized South, which holds the capital city of Maputo and is strategically located near South Africa—Mozambique’s most important trading partner. While comprising only 10% of the country’s population, Maputo accounts for over 40% of the GDP (PARPA-2001). Mozambique's once substantial foreign debt has been reduced through forgiveness and rescheduling under the IMF's Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) policy and is now at a manageable level. Health and food security are the two mayor concerns in Mozambique. Life expectancy at birth is 31.3 years. With 4.6 births per woman the population growth rate is 0.8%, infant mortality is 217 deaths per 1,000 live births. Population per physician 36,191people (1999) and population per hospital bed are 1,153 people. Food availability remains a significant problem, with the majority of households not yet able to provide for year-round food needs. Hunger seasons occur with variable duration and severity. Location: South-eastern Africa, bordering the Mozambique Channel, between South Africa and Tanzania Area - comparative: Slightly less than twice the size of California Population: 17,479,266 Note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates. Note: information available as of 1 January 2003 used in the preparation of The World Fact book 2003 Mozambique is one of the poorest countries in the world. With over 80% of the workforce occupied in agriculture food insecurity is still an important issue. Poverty remains an overriding concern in Mozambique and is known as ABSOLUTE Poverty. The national financial incapacity to properly attend health services is frightening. Food insecurity results from a combination of availability and access problems, as well as utilization issues.  Availability and access problems are partly attributed to war-related devastation.  Food crops, cash crops, and marketing infrastructure all suffered severe damage during the civil conflict.  In some areas, smallholder farming has yet to be rehabilitated even to subsistence level. Additionally, according to the MOH, UNICEF, and national authorities, poor health and inadequate food utilization also contribute to food insecurity.  UNICEF’s experience indicates that lack of knowledge regarding good nutrition is a widespread problem.  Illness, due in part to inadequate nutrition, results in decreased individual productivity among smallholders.  Consumption of a limited number of staple crops such as cassava, maize and groundnuts, without the inclusion of vitamin or protein-rich foods, is common and traditional.  In addition, parasite-related debilitating diseases adversely affect an individual’s capacity to utilize food. This leads to decreased local food availability and access, and increased food insecurity. According to the National Director of Health (NDH) life expectancy is only 42 years, not considering the stillborn. Only 40% to 50% of the national territory is covered by some kind Important efforts are undertaken to strengthen the agro-industrial capacity of the country. Considerable international funding is put into the revival of the national cashew nut production. The country was once the number one cashew producer in the world.of health services. Un-sufficient funding and the lack of medical personal, 652 Physicians for a population of 17,5 million, induced the administration to lock for alternatives. Educational programs are implemented to train district administrators, teachers, agricultural extension workers and other public employees living in the communities to assist in treatments against the number one killer, Malaria. NGOs and churches are urged to lend a helping hand. The limited availability of only US Dollar 2.00 (two) per capita and year for medication complicates the matter further. Inefficient health services, a mal nourished and diseased population, suffering and dying rapidly from Malaria and Aids are counter-productive ingredients for any kind of economy. Though a number of NGOs are trying to help alleviate the desperate situation in the area of health services, disease prevention and treatment, it’s the lack of trained professionals with at least a basic knowledge in this field that hinders the advance of the work.
 MENU
Email: pcarstens@lifelinetoafrica.org
LIFE LINE TO AFRICA
Copyright © 2007. All Rights Reserved.
Mozambique, Africa
Learn about Mozambique
Source of information: WWW Official Government Page
Located along the Indian Ocean of southern Africa, Mozambique is slightly less than twice the size of California with a population of 17.5 million (’2003 Estimate). In 1975, after centuries of colonial exploitation, Mozambique gained its independence from Portugal. The indigenes population had no access to education during the Colonial Era. An uneducated population combined with a large-scale exodus of whites, mad the country vulnerable to violence. Shortly after independence, the country was plunged into a brutal civil war between the (then) Marxist- Leninist Frelimo government and a rebel movement, Renamo, with principal backing from South Africa. During this 18-year civil war, more than one million people died, two million refugees fled across the borders, and close to three million rural families were internally displaced. Coupled with a severe drought and socialist mismanagement, by the time a peace accord was signed in 1994, much of the country’s economic infrastructure had been destroyed, approximately two million land mines were buried in Mozambique’s arable land, and with a US$80 per capita GNP, Mozambique was classified by the World Bank as the world’s poorest country. Since then Mozambique has made significant progress. The government has undertaken a series of market reforms and liberalization measures. During the late ‘90s, Mozambique boasted one of the fastest growing economies in the world. This momentum was halted by the severe flooding that devastated the southern region of the country in the early part of 2000 and to a lesser extent in the North during 2001.During the years of 2002 and 2003 the country experienced a sever drought.  Not withstanding these setbacks, economic growth rates have rebounded to pre- flood levels. While significant gains have in fact been made, Mozambique still remains one of the world’s poorest counties. Sixty-nine percent of the population still live in abject poverty, and more than one in five children die before the age of five (DHS-’97). Similarly, much of the gains from the economic growth have been limited to the more industrialized South, which holds the capital city of Maputo and is strategically located near South Africa—Mozambique’s most important trading partner. While comprising only 10% of the country’s population, Maputo accounts for over 40% of the GDP (PARPA-2001). Mozambique's once substantial foreign debt has been reduced through forgiveness and rescheduling under the IMF's Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) policy and is now at a manageable level. Health and food security are the two mayor concerns in Mozambique. Life expectancy at birth is 31.3 years. With 4.6 births per woman the population growth rate is 0.8%, infant mortality is 217 deaths per 1,000 live births. Population per physician 36,191people (1999) and population per hospital bed are 1,153 people. Food availability remains a significant problem, with the majority of households not yet able to provide for year-round food needs. Hunger seasons occur with variable duration and severity. Location: South-eastern Africa, bordering the Mozambique Channel, between South Africa and Tanzania Area - comparative: Slightly less than twice the size of California Population: 17,479,266 Note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates. Note: information available as of 1 January 2003 used in the preparation of The World Fact book 2003 Mozambique is one of the poorest countries in the world. With over 80% of the workforce occupied in agriculture food insecurity is still an important issue. Poverty remains an overriding concern in Mozambique and is known as ABSOLUTE Poverty. The national financial incapacity to properly attend health services is frightening. Food insecurity results from a combination of availability and access problems, as well as utilization issues.  Availability and access problems are partly attributed to war-related devastation.  Food crops, cash crops, and marketing infrastructure all suffered severe damage during the civil conflict.  In some areas, smallholder farming has yet to be rehabilitated even to subsistence level. Additionally, according to the MOH, UNICEF, and national authorities, poor health and inadequate food utilization also contribute to food insecurity.  UNICEF’s experience indicates that lack of knowledge regarding good nutrition is a widespread problem.  Illness, due in part to inadequate nutrition, results in decreased individual productivity among smallholders.  Consumption of a limited number of staple crops such as cassava, maize and groundnuts, without the inclusion of vitamin or protein-rich foods, is common and traditional.  In addition, parasite-related debilitating diseases adversely affect an individual’s capacity to utilize food. This leads to decreased local food availability and access, and increased food insecurity. According to the National Director of Health (NDH) life expectancy is only 42 years, not considering the stillborn. Only 40% to 50% of the national territory is covered by some kind Important efforts are undertaken to strengthen the agro-industrial capacity of the country. Considerable international funding is put into the revival of the national cashew nut production. The country was once the number one cashew producer in the world.of health services. Un- sufficient funding and the lack of medical personal, 652 Physicians for a population of 17,5 million, induced the administration to lock for alternatives. Educational programs are implemented to train district administrators, teachers, agricultural extension workers and other public employees living in the communities to assist in treatments against the number one killer, Malaria. NGOs and churches are urged to lend a helping hand. The limited availability of only US Dollar 2.00 (two) per capita and year for medication complicates the matter further. Inefficient health services, a mal nourished and diseased population, suffering and dying rapidly from Malaria and Aids are counter-productive ingredients for any kind of economy. Though a number of NGOs are trying to help alleviate the desperate situation in the area of health services, disease prevention and treatment, it’s the lack of trained professionals with at least a basic knowledge in this field that hinders the advance of the work.
 MENU